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More diagnoses & more referrals!

13 Sep

Last week I had an ultrasound to try and determine the source of the blockage that is causing me to retain fluid in my abdomen, legs and ankles. I was able to see most of the action on the screen.

The kidneys seems to be clear and the lower vena cava (the major vein that runs behind the liver) was also flowing well. They could not see the hepatic vein so when I reported to the hospice with a view to having the fluid in my abdomen drained I had some more tests and these seemed to indicate that perhaps one of the metastases in the liver is applying pressure to that hepatic vein and causing a partial blockage.

They did not drain the abdomen because it is still reasonably soft and some of the swelling is caused by gas. It is a bit risky at this stage so I agreed with their suggestion that as it is not causing major problems, I should wait until it is absolutely necessary before I go down that track. Instead they have increased the diuretic medication and referred me to the physiotherapist at the hospital who specializes in lymphatic drainage. This should at least bring some relief to the swelling to the legs and ankles.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 13 September, 2011 in Medical, Personal

 

2 Responses to More diagnoses & more referrals!

  1. Laurie Rowston

    23 October, 2011 at 5:02 pm

    Remembering Doug Duncan
    Douglas Stewart Duncan died peacefully on 5 October from complications from cancer first diagnosed in 2008. In his final years he inspired many with his sermons and blog posts about living with the disease. Doug was now a retired minister in the Presbyterian church of New Zealand. He had served as a pastor or associate pastor in churches in New Zealand and Australia. He was a pioneer in the Christian education movement in both countries. He is survived by his wife, Bronwen, four children: Simeon, James, Philippa and Rebekah and ten grandchildren.
    When Rev. Ken Godfrey concluded his ministry here, our Church started looking for a new Pastor. The Rev. Norman Pell, the General Superintendent of the Baptist Union of Tasmania, recognised that we needed an outgoing person with an evangelical outlook and Doug’s name was put forward. Doug shared later that when he was to be interviewed by the Deacons, he had to wait outside the room for a few minutes and heard guffaws of laughter from within. He thought to himself, “I could work with this lot,” and so he did! Inducted into the pastorate on 18 February 1999, Doug proved to be someone who was able to work with anyone. He also had outside contacts with politicians, business people, folk from other denominations and young people.
    Doug always led from the front and liked to try new ideas. For example, some people said that they could not get to Sunday communion due to work commitments so he commenced a worship service on Thursdays evenings. To these he invited special guests such as Senator Eric Abetz to talk about their Christian Faith in the workplace and then held communion. If a new idea did not work, he was not afraid to admit it and would discontinue it.
    He was a keen musician and quite a competent trombonist (although he admitted that he did not practise enough). He organised Hymnfests in conjunction with the Hobart Corps of the Salvation Army. In the Sunday Services, again he introduced new songs and inspired others, too.
    He was interested in the area of the Christian in business and lectured on the concept here and overseas. He held that the Christian business model was the reverse of the normal world model as the leader was at the bottom of the structure as a servant leader. Doug was one who “led by serving and served by leading”.
    At his funeral on 11 October in Nelson, New Zealand, Doug’s son James said that his father followed his own father’s footsteps into the ministry, starting in Nelson. James said, “He had a sharp mind and an easy preaching style, though he by no means took the easy way out of preaching the truths he found in the word of God that he so loved and respected. Further, it was the easiest thing in the world to engage him in a conversation about doctrine or theology, and you knew that, even when he might disagree with you, he enjoyed the challenge of seeking answers and resolution in the Word.” James continued, “He was also an entrepreneur. The word “No” had a peculiar attraction to him. Upon being told that something couldn’t be done, he’d set about scheming how to turn the negative into the affirmative. Show him a boundary and he’d push against it questioning how he could start something new and how he could do something novel. He added that his father was also an educator, “He was the driving force behind Nelson Christian Academy, the first Christian school of its kind in New Zealand. After that, he sold his house to build a Christian school in Hokitika. Track Dad’s life on a map and you’ll find he started some kind of school almost everywhere he went: Calvary in Christchurch, Bible colleges on the Gold Coast and Geelong and Westminster Hall in Hobart.”
    Doug loved his family and he died as he wished, surrounded by them. At the funeral James also noted that his Dad had the ability to see the fun in pretty much anything. “Even his cancer and decline,” commented James, “became fodder for jokes and laughter in our conversations with him.” At his ordination in Hobart on 4 August 2002 he cracked that all it that did was to make him “more revved up”! Continued James, “He showed us that life is joy even when you’re dying. Talking to Dad on the last Tuesday afternoon before he died, he was still talking about working and living life as actively as he could. His last two sermons were about finishing the race strongly and he practised what he preached. He was so proud of being able to baptise and dedicate two of his grandchildren, Abe and Phoebe, on his final weekend. Loving his God mattered more to him than money, reputation or health. Living for God’s glory was his permanent vocation.”
    – Laurie Rowston MA, Hobart Baptist Church. I am indebted to the contributions of Rod Tedds who was the Elder and Secretary at Hobart Baptist Church during much of Doug’s ministry and Doug’s son, James.

     
  2. Laurie Rowston

    5 December, 2011 at 10:29 pm

    Douglas Stewart Duncan died peacefully in Nelson, New Zealand, on 5 October aged sixty-six years from complications from cancer first diagnosed in 2008. Doug was now a retired minister in the Presbyterian church of New Zealand. He had served as a pastor or associate pastor in churches in New Zealand and Australia. He was a pioneer in the Christian education movement in both countries.
    Doug followed the Rev. Ken Godfrey at the Hobart Baptist church and he was inducted into the pastorate on 18 February 1999. Doug proved to be someone who was able to work with anyone. He also had outside contacts with politicians, business people, folk from other denominations and young people.  Doug always led from the front and liked to try new ideas including commencing a worship service on Thursday evenings for those who could not get there on Sundays due to work commitments.  If a new idea did not work, he was not afraid to admit it and would discontinue it.
    He was a keen musician. He had been a trombonist in the Australian Army Band and in Hobart took up the violin again. In Hobart he organised hymnfests in conjunction with the Hobart Corps of the Salvation Army. He was interested in the area of the Christian in business and lectured on the concept here and overseas.  He held that the Christian business model was the reverse of the normal world model as the leader was at the bottom of the structure as a servant leader.  He was ordained at the Hobart church on 4 August 2002.
    Doug was born on 19 July1945, of OMF (CIM) parents, in Kalimpong in the mountains of northern India. His parents were serving as missionaries in China. He spent his early years in China. The family was evacuated from Communist China when he was five and they returned to New Zealand where his father served as a Baptist minister until his retirement. After studying at the University of Otago, Doug worked briefly as a social worker and law clerk. Then Doug followed his own father’s footsteps into the ministry, starting in Nelson in NZ. He was the driving force behind Nelson Christian Academy, the first Christian school of its kind in New Zealand. After that, he sold his house to build a Christian school in Hokitika. Similar schools followed: Calvary in Christchurch, Bible colleges on the Gold Coast and Geelong and Westminster Hall in Hobart. At Westminster Hall he trained students in theology, education, law, natural medicine from distinctly Biblical presuppositions. Since 1985 Doug and his wife Bronwen lived mostly in Australia and took citizenship here. He was associate pastor at Barrabool Hills Baptist Church in Geelong. He regularly conducted seminars for churches in Malaysia and Singapore and these continued during the Hobart pastorate. Bronwen worked in her area, carrying out pioneering work in home-schooling and establishing support centres and teaching disabled children. In the final decade of Doug’s life, at the end of the Hobart pastorate in 2004, they returned to New Zealand where Doug pastored the Hanmer Springs Presbyterian Church, before retiring to Nelson. Doug trained as a psychiatric social worker and also achieved the qualifications of B.Ed., M.Ed. (Christian Education), LTCL (Communication) and L.Th., the last being in 1995.
    In Hobart he is remembered as one who had a super-abundance of enthusiasm in his service for the Lord. He “led by serving and served by leading”. He assisted people in discovering their individual callings in the kingdom of God and providing resources to enable them to discover Biblical presuppositions associated with those occupations. In his son James’s words, “Loving his God mattered more to him than money, reputation or health. Living for God’s glory was his permanent vocation.” Doug was also very much a family man. Over his final weekend he baptised and dedicated two of his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Bronwen, four adult children and their families. – Ed., Rod Tedds and Simon Duncan.

     

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